//
archives

John Kenny

I have had fiction published in Fear the Reaper, Emerald Eye: The Best of Irish Imaginative Fiction, Transtories, The World SF Blog, Revival Literary Journal, First Contact, FTL, Woman’s Way, Jupiter Magazine and several other venues. Currently looking for a publisher for my novel Down and Out. I was co-editor of Albedo One from 1993 to 2013 and co-administrator of its International Aeon Award for Short Fiction from 2005 to 2013. Previous to that I edited several issues of FTL (1990 – 1992). I’ve also edited Writing4all: The Best of 2009 and Box of Delights, an original horror anthology from Aeon Press Books.
John Kenny has written 51 posts for John Kenny

A Night on the Town in Maputo

In a previous life I worked for a consultancy company that managed donor-funded overseas development aid programmes in Central and Eastern Europe, Africa and the Middle East. Essentially, they were projects funded by the EU, the World Bank and various national aid agencies and aimed at assisting economic development and recovery. My job was to … Continue reading

Book Review: Longsword by Thomas Leland

Longsword tells the story of William Longespée, the illegitimate son of King Henry II, who was married by his half-brother, then King Richard I, into the family of Salisbury, becoming the Earl of Salisbury. Published in 1762, this new edition from Swan River Press is its first appearance in print in over 30 years and … Continue reading

The Supernatural Tale in Today’s World: John Kenny talks to R.B. Russell

I’ve just interviewed R.B. Russell about how the supernatural tale has changed over time, his collection of short stories, Ghosts, recently published by Swan River Press (and already out of print), and the importance of the small press in today’s publishing industry. I’ll post the full interview on this site soon, but in the meantime, … Continue reading

Book Review: Old Albert by Brian J. Showers

Old Albert charts the history of Larkhill House from circa 1840 to the 1920s, with a coda that brings the story up to the present day, and apart from one chapter that digresses to Ireland’s Eye, is set in Larkhill and its Rathmines environs. Larkhill House is a real place, as is St. Mary’s Church, … Continue reading

Self-publishing and the Editorial Process – Guest Blog

This week, I was asked to write a guest blog for Writing4all, a free online resource for writers. Given that I make my daily crust as a freelance editor, I thought, for a change, I’d focus specifically on the important of the editorial process itself, which has become all the more crucial now with the … Continue reading

Book Review: The Whisper Jar by Carole Lanham

There is the danger that a casual perusal of the contents page of Carole Lanham’s collection The Whisper Jar may give the potential reader the impression that this is a work of whimsy, but nothing could be further from the truth. There is certainly an element of whimsy sown into some of the stories, but … Continue reading

Submitting Your Work Part 3: Cover Letters

Cover letters are a curious creature. Editors generally pay scarce attention to them, certainly if they accompany a short story submission to a magazine, anthology or webzine. And yet they are nearly always a submission requirement. A sure way to put an editor’s nose out of joint is to post or email a submission with … Continue reading

The Eerie Tales of Lucy M. Boston: John Kenny talks to Robert Lloyd Parry

I’ve just interviewed Robert Lloyd Parry about the supernatural fiction of Lucy M. Boston, best known for her Green Knowe series of children’s novels. Robert wrote the introduction to Curfew & Other Eerie Tales, Swan River Press‘ collection of her supernatural tales. I’ll post the full interview on this site soon, but in the meantime, … Continue reading

Book Review: The Floating Order by Erin Pringle

The wonder of The Floating Order, a collection of short stories by Erin Pringle, is that it is impossible to pigeonhole. At their heart the stories have a darkly fantastic edge, but this aspect is more often than not a component of the character’s view of the outside world. Skewed perspectives dominate, particularly in the … Continue reading

In Praise of Old Age

There’s no question that getting old is a pain in the butt. You work hard all your life, you struggle for a level of security and relative comfort, which often seems constantly just out of reach, you do your best to provide for and nurture your kids, then bits of you start to fall off … Continue reading